Sunday, August 24, 2014

A CULTURAL PUZZLE ...


The history of erecting statues as memorials to those who have passed on is mixed.   Examples range from the entirely justified, the traditionally classic to the frankly absurd and although it hurts me to recall an embarrassing episode in the history of Southampton FC,  I have to admit that the first effort to honour former player, manager and club President, Ted Bates, took the form of a lifelike representation of Jimmy Krankie clutching a ball whilst perched on his plinth outside St. Mary`s Stadium.   

The ensuing outcry, however, demanded that that dismal failure be removed, the `sculptor` criticised, the committee who sanctioned it chastised and a more worthy second attempt commissioned.   As a result, a dignified and genuine representation of Ted Bates` true character emerged from the chaos.  Here are the `before and after` versions:-


So eventually all was well that ended well, but it was the realisation that a statue was entirely appropriate to honour someone who had given his life to the club that was the most important consideration.   And I guess that in the history of statue commissioning, a number of criteria are used before deciding to go ahead, including such things as the status of the subject, their contribution to the locality, the country or the world in general, the example they have set for others to follow and the respect which they have earned in their lifetime.

So I`m puzzled as to what criteria may have been used in the People`s Republic of Camden where a statue has been commissioned and will be unveiled shortly in memory of Amy Winehouse. 

1 comment:

Ray Turner said...

Beats me Snopper. Amy Winehouse had a great voice, but I find it hard to have much respect for the other things that she did during her brief life...